Skip Frye

Skip Frye_Blog_300x250

“Skip Frye is one of the all-time great surfers and one of the all-time great surfboard shapers!  Skip is true surfing royalty,” said Aaron Pai, founder of the Surfers’ Hall of Fame.  “We are truly stoked to honor Skip for all he has done for our sport.”

Skip Frye was born in 1941 and began surfing at age 16 after moving with his family to the north San Diego suburb of Pacific Beach.  His birth name was Harry, but since his father was away in the military, he was assigned the task of being the “skipper” around the house and the name stuck.  His first wave riding experience came at Pacific Beach in 1958, and was the beginning of a lifelong passion that continues to this day.

By the mid-60s the shy but focused Frye had become one of California’s best competitors.  Known for his gliding, fluid style which allowed him to capture several local and national titles, Skip competed in the first Duke Kahanamoku Surfing Championships at Sunset Beach and also represented the U.S. at the World Contests in 1966 and 1968, narrowly missing the final of each occasion.   The venue for 1968 was Puerto Rico, which instantly became his favorite surf destination, thanks to its warm, idyllic surf and Latino flavor.  A photo of him from the trip appeared on the cover of the Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue.

Skip’s talents for shaping surfboards began to emerge in 1963 and within two years he was working for San Diego’s Gordon & Smith’s Surfboards; in 1966 G&S introduced the Skip Frye signature model.  Frye was riding a 9’6” board in late 1967 when he traveled to Australia with the legendary Windansea Surf Club for an American versus Australia team contest (the U.S. team got waxed by Aussies riding lighter boards).  After that trip, Skip became more interested in shorter more maneuverable boards and began experimenting with designs such as the V-bottom and Baby Gun.

He kept refining the designs and created a board he called the Egg, one of his best-known shapes.  As longboards nearly vanished overnight, Frye went with the flow, working on egg shapes and later experimenting with the Fish (his keel-fin, heavy-glassed split-tails remain in high-demand throughout So Cal).  Skip stayed with G&S until the mid-seventies and then struck out on his own to shape boards at the Green Room and at his own place called The Shack, behind Select Surf Shop in Pacific Beach.

In 1981 Skip returned to Gordon & Smith and also started competing again.  He left G&S in 1986 to join the crew at Diamond Glassing, and began shaping under his own business name, Skip Frye Surfboards.  It was here that he developed his iconic Diamond Frye Logo, a combination of wings and a diamond. In 1988 Skip and his wife Donna officially opened Skip Frye Surfboards, which was a small shaping room and front office that adjoined Windansea Surf Shop in Pacific Beach.  Skip began shaping and working on new fin configurations for longer boards, as he was a fan of the smooth glide the increased planning surface allowed. Through this work, he developed a variety of shapes, including the Eagle and Fish Simmons.

In November 1990, Skip and Donna left Windansea, moved across the street and opened Harry’s Surf Shop with longtime friend and fellow surfer/shaper Harry “Hank” Warner.  Harry’s was the namesake of not only Skip and Hank, but both their fathers and also Hank and Donna’s grandfathers.  Harry’s was not your typical surf shop; it was a combination retail store, surf museum, art gallery, shaping shop and political gathering place.  Photos of customers with their new boards lined the walls and art pieces and sculptures from local artists were prominently featured.

Skip’s career has had many twists and turns, however, he was never more energized than during the longboard revival.  ”The biggest buzz I ever had in surfing was the early ’90s when I went back to the big ones,” he recalls. “I mean the 11-footers.  The same thing happened to Duke Kahanamoku when Tom Blake reintroduced him to the 16-foot olos back in the ’30s.”
Skip’s boards have slowly become collector’s pieces often passed down through generations.  Meanwhile, Skip continues his own tireless work for surfing’s constituency by collecting and building boards, his keel-fin fish being particularly popular.  ”I feel it’s my duty to pass along the heritage of our sport,” he says with a passion.  But there’s still a long way to go, a lot of work to be done.”

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Shane Dorian

Shane Dorian_Blog_300x250

A fearless surfer from Hawaii’s Big Island, Shane’s lengthy resume of accomplishments includes costarring in the 1998 big-wave melodrama In God’s Hands, winning the 1999 Rip Curl Bells and 2000 Billabong Pro Mundaka World Tour events, and a top 5 ASP ranking in 2000.  The wiry (5’8”, 150 pounds) Dorian was a leading “New School” aerialist in the early ‘90s, since the middle ‘90s has been one of the world’s best big-wave riders taking top prize in the 2008 and 2013 XXL Global Big Wave awards, and is a tube rider of phenomenal agility and precision.

Shane Dorian was born on July 19, 1972 in Kailua Kona, Hawaii to his father Patrick, a former Hollywood actor and stunt double for Elvis Presley, and his mother Susan, an independent, strong-willed woman who went on to compete in female bodybuilding events.  When Shane was three, his parents opened a restaurant called Dorian’s right on the beach.  Since Dorian was too young to wait tables, the long hours hanging around the restaurant soon forced him to turn to the ocean for amusement.  Along with best friend Mike Stewart, he virtually lived at the once-empty grommet breeding pool known as Banyans…on bodyboards.

Shane began surfing at age five in 1977; it took him six years to win his first contest, then another three to win the Hawaiian State titles.  Surfing education became a top priority as Dorian’s mother worked out a system where Shane would spend the second and third school quarters on the North Shore of Oahu (the peak winter season) and the first and fourth quarters back home on the Big Island.  ”The schools didn’t really understand it,” said Shane.  ”But I don’t blame ‘em. The concept of pro surfing was so foreign to them back then.”

Dorian’s official coming-out party was during the Gotcha Pro at Sandy Beach in 1987.  He beat out big names, made it through four rounds and got some media exposure.  More importantly, he became friends with a couple of the heavies and the up-and-coming surfers on Oahu, Brock Little and Todd Chesser.  With Little and Chesser leading the way and Dorian following, an informal North Shore boot camp was instated.

Shane proved in the following years he could not only keep up with the big boys but also surpass them.  But in ‘92, with a few years of heavywater experience under his belt, he followed Chesser and Little out to an outer reef during an exceptionally giant day.

“It took us, like, 45 minutes to get out there. And then when we did, we were facing these 25-foot waves with crazy cleanup sets.  I sat outside those guys for a while, but then I started getting pissed when they caught a bunch of waves,” Dorian recalls.

“About that time, the horizon went dark from this huge set and we started scratching.  I was too deep, but I wanted a wave so bad that I just flipped around and went on the first one.”  Shane launched over the falls, lost consciousness and then regained consciousness to find he could not feel his legs and was foaming at the mouth.  “I barely made it through that one, but it was a major turning point for me. As Brock said, it was the first time I realized that I was mortal.”

When he wasn’t tempting fate, Dorian engaged in much safer activities like charging Backdoor.  Surfing alongside a rapidly growing crew that included Kelly SlaterRob Machado, Chris Malloy, Taylor Knox, Benji Weatherley and Conan Hayes, Dorian helped launch a new breed of surfing that included a whole bag of anti-gravity tricks combined with traditional carving and heavy-wave charging.  Dubbed the “New School” and well documented in Taylor Steele’s videos, the New School remained the established surfing order through the 90s.

Dorian joined the ASP World Tour in 1993 where he hovered outside of the top 10 for a number of years before cracking the barrier with a fourth-place finish in 2000.  Popular among surfers and fans, Shane finished runner-up to Kelly Slater in the 2000 Surfer Magazine Readers Poll Awards and finished 2nd in the prestigious 2001 Quiksilver in Memory of Eddie Aikau big wave contest.  Shane received the coveted “Waterman of the Year” award from SIMA in 2012, one of the sport’s highest honors.  Earlier this year, Shane Dorian went home with two awards for an unbelievable barrel ride at Jaws earlier this season, winning $55,000 for the Pacifico Tube and Billabong XXL Ride of The Year.

“Shane Dorian is one of the most famous and gifted Big Wave Surfers on the Planet and a true Surfing Legend,” said Surfers’ Hall of Fame founder Aaron Pai!  “Shane continues to inspire generations of Surfers.  We are stoked to be able to thank Shane Dorian for his achievements and contributions to our Surfing World and are happy and excited that he will be here for his induction into the Surfers’ Hall of Fame!”

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Rick “Rockin’ Fig” Fignetti

Rockin Fig_Blog_300x250

“Rick ‘Rockin Fig’ Fignetti is a home grown Huntington Beach surfing legend; one of Huntington’s finest,” said Surfers’ Hall of Fame founder Aaron Pai.  “He’s been an amazing ambassador for our sport both in and out of the water.”

For more than 20 years, the name “Rockin Fig” has been synonymous with surfing and Huntington Beach.  From his lengthy stint on KROQ FM as the resident “surfologist” to announcing major competitions like the U.S. Open of Surfing, Bud Surf Tour and NSSA Nationals, his unique and quirky voice is instantly recognizable to competitors and fans alike.  Old time surfers might even remember hearing his surf reports on 976-SURF back in the day when people actually used a landline to call for surf updates.  More recently he can be seen and heard on TV and radio commercials as a spokesperson for Toyota of HB.

Despite his notoriety and commercial success, Fig is a surfer first and foremost, and spent more than three decades in pursuit of an individual championship title.  Fig competed in the first NSSA National Championships in 1978, making it to the finals and was on the Orange Coast College team that won a title in 1979 and 1980.  Although a 10-time West Coast Surfing Champion, an individual NSSA (National Scholastic Surfing Assoication) title remained elusive for 35 years until he won his first (and second) titles as a 55 year-old last year.

“I’ve made a lot of final appearances, but have never been able to pull off the win,” Fig stated after his crowning achievement.  “I’ve waited forever. I thought I’d never possibly get a national title before I died.  There’s always been an empty spot in my heart, thinking every time I’ve kind of messed up.  So I’m kind of at peace with myself.”

Considered an institution locally, Fig is the proprietor at Rockin Fig Surf Headquarters on Main Street; an old-school shop with tons of surfboards that he is happy to discuss with an encyclopedic knowledge.  Rick is also a journalist of some note, having penned a column in the Huntington Beach Independent and Los Angeles Times for many years.  Hardcore surfers can find him most every day on the north side of the pier, riding waves and loving life.

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2013 Surfers’ Hall of Fame Inductee – Skip Frye

HUNTINGTON BEACH, Calif. – Harry Richard “Skip” Frye’s profound impact on the surfing world, from stylish competitor and world-class shaper to environmental ambassador, has spanned nearly six decades.  The Surfers’ Hall of Fame takes great pride in announcing that Skip will join fellow surfers Shane Dorian and Rick “Rockin Fig” Fignetti as an inductee into the 2013 class of the Surfers’ Hall of Fame on Friday, July 26 at 10 a.m. in front of Huntington Surf & Sport.  Please visit http://hsssurf.com/shof for more information.

The Surfers’ Hall of Fame induction ceremony pays tribute to those individuals who have made an indelible mark on the sport, industry and culture of surfing.  Annually, tens of thousands of visitors travel to Huntington Beach’s downtown area and literally walk in the footsteps of surfing superstars and legends from several eras including Laird Hamilton, Andy Irons, Jack O’Neill, Robert August, Bob Hurley, Sean Collins, Kelly Slater, Lisa Andersen, Pat O’Connell, Al Merrick, Shaun Tomson, Rob Machado and Rabbit Kekai, who are immortalized in cement.

“Skip Frye is one of the all-time great surfers and one of the all-time great surfboard shapers!  Skip is true surfing royalty,” said Aaron Pai, founder of the Surfers’ Hall of Fame.  “We are truly stoked to honor Skip for all he has done for our sport.”

Skip Frye was born in 1941 and began surfing at age 16 after moving with his family to the north San Diego suburb of Pacific Beach.  His birth name was Harry, but since his father was away in the military, he was assigned the task of being the “skipper” around the house and the name stuck.  His first wave riding experience came at Pacific Beach in 1958, and was the beginning of a lifelong passion that continues to this day.

By the mid-60s the shy but focused Frye had become one of California’s best competitors.  Known for his gliding, fluid style which allowed him to capture several local and national titles, Skip competed in the first Duke Kahanamoku Surfing Championships at Sunset Beach and also represented the U.S. at the World Contests in 1966 and 1968, narrowly missing the final of each occasion.   The venue for 1968 was Puerto Rico, which instantly became his favorite surf destination, thanks to its warm, idyllic surf and Latino flavor.  A photo of him from the trip appeared on the cover of the Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue.

Skip’s talents for shaping surfboards began to emerge in 1963 and within two years he was working for San Diego’s Gordon & Smith’s Surfboards; in 1966 G&S introduced the Skip Frye signature model.  Frye was riding a 9’6” board in late 1967 when he traveled to Australia with the legendary Windansea Surf Club for an American versus Australia team contest (the U.S. team got waxed by Aussies riding lighter boards).  After that trip, Skip became more interested in shorter more maneuverable boards and began experimenting with designs such as the V-bottom and Baby Gun.

He kept refining the designs and created a board he called the Egg, one of his best-known shapes.  As longboards nearly vanished overnight, Frye went with the flow, working on egg shapes and later experimenting with the Fish (his keel-fin, heavy-glassed split-tails remain in high-demand throughout So Cal).  Skip stayed with G&S until the mid-seventies and then struck out on his own to shape boards at the Green Room and at his own place called The Shack, behind Select Surf Shop in Pacific Beach.

In 1981 Skip returned to Gordon & Smith and also started competing again.  He left G&S in 1986 to join the crew at Diamond Glassing, and began shaping under his own business name, Skip Frye Surfboards.  It was here that he developed his iconic Diamond Frye Logo, a combination of wings and a diamond. In 1988 Skip and his wife Donna officially opened Skip Frye Surfboards, which was a small shaping room and front office that adjoined Windansea Surf Shop in Pacific Beach.  Skip began shaping and working on new fin configurations for longer boards, as he was a fan of the smooth glide the increased planning surface allowed. Through this work, he developed a variety of shapes, including the Eagle and Fish Simmons.

In November 1990, Skip and Donna left Windansea, moved across the street and opened Harry’s Surf Shop with longtime friend and fellow surfer/shaper Harry “Hank” Warner.  Harry’s was the namesake of not only Skip and Hank, but both their fathers and also Hank and Donna’s grandfathers.  Harry’s was not your typical surf shop; it was a combination retail store, surf museum, art gallery, shaping shop and political gathering place.  Photos of customers with their new boards lined the walls and art pieces and sculptures from local artists were prominently featured.

Skip’s career has had many twists and turns, however, he was never more energized than during the longboard revival.  ”The biggest buzz I ever had in surfing was the early ’90s when I went back to the big ones,” he recalls. “I mean the 11-footers.  The same thing happened to Duke Kahanamoku when Tom Blake reintroduced him to the 16-foot olos back in the ’30s.”
Skip’s boards have slowly become collector’s pieces often passed down through generations.  Meanwhile, Skip continues his own tireless work for surfing’s constituency by collecting and building boards, his keel-fin fish being particularly popular.  ”I feel it’s my duty to pass along the heritage of our sport,” he says with a passion.  But there’s still a long way to go, a lot of work to be done.”

The nation’s first imprint collection of legendary surfers, the Surfers’ Hall of Fame, celebrated its first induction in 1997 inside of specialty retailer Huntington Surf & Sport where several slabs remain.  Four years later with the blessing of the City Council and a stunning bronze statue of sport’s spiritual leader Duke Kahanamoku serving as a backdrop, the ceremony moved outside to the corner of PCH and Main; less than 100 feet from the famed Huntington Beach Pier, site of the U.S. Open of Surfing.

The Surfers’ Hall of Fame induction ceremony is open to the public, free-of-charge.  Further information is available at http://hsssurf.com/shof/.

Press Contacts:
Mike Kingsbury, Jennifer Hernandez, MKM
Mike@teammkm.com; Jennifer@teammkm.com

(714) 375-2188

Credits: Skipfryesurf.com, Surfline.com, the Encyclopedia of Surfing and Wikipedia.com

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2013 Surfers’ Hall of Fame Inductee – Rick “Rockin’ Fig” Fignetti

HUNTINGTON BEACH, Calif. – The iconic Huntington Beach surfer/shop owner with the distinctive voice that so many of us have heard over the years on the radio, at contests and on television commercials will cement his place among the sport’s idols later this month.  Rick “Rockin Fig” Fignetti  will join fellow surfers Shane Dorian and Skip Frye as an inductee into the 2013 class of the Surfers’ Hall of Fame on Friday, July 26 at 10 a.m. in front of Huntington Surf & Sport.  Please visit http://hsssurf.com/shof for more information.

The nation’s first imprint collection of legendary surfers, the Surfers’ Hall of Fame, celebrated its first induction in 1997 inside of specialty retailer Huntington Surf & Sport where several slabs remain.  Four years later with the blessing of the City Council and a stunning bronze statue of sport’s spiritual leader Duke Kahanamoku serving as a backdrop, the ceremony moved outside to the corner of PCH and Main; less than 100 feet from the famed Huntington Beach Pier, site of the U.S. Open of Surfing.

“Rick ‘Rockin Fig’ Fignetti is a home grown Huntington Beach surfing legend; one of Huntington’s finest,” said Surfers’ Hall of Fame founder Aaron Pai.  “He’s been an amazing ambassador for our sport both in and out of the water.”

For more than 20 years, the name “Rockin Fig” has been synonymous with surfing and Huntington Beach.  From his lengthy stint on KROQ FM as the resident “surfologist” to announcing major competitions like the U.S. Open of Surfing, Bud Surf Tour and NSSA Nationals, his unique and quirky voice is instantly recognizable to competitors and fans alike.  Old time surfers might even remember hearing his surf reports on 976-SURF back in the day when people actually used a landline to call for surf updates.  More recently he can be seen and heard on TV and radio commercials as a spokesperson for Toyota of HB.

Despite his notoriety and commercial success, Fig is a surfer first and foremost, and spent more than three decades in pursuit of an individual championship title.  Fig competed in the first NSSA National Championships in 1978, making it to the finals and was on the Orange Coast College team that won a title in 1979 and 1980.  Although a 10-time West Coast Surfing Champion, an individual NSSA (National Scholastic Surfing Assoication) title remained elusive for 35 years until he won his first (and second) titles as a 55 year-old last year.

“I’ve made a lot of final appearances, but have never been able to pull off the win,” Fig stated after his crowning achievement.  “I’ve waited forever. I thought I’d never possibly get a national title before I died.  There’s always been an empty spot in my heart, thinking every time I’ve kind of messed up.  So I’m kind of at peace with myself.”

Considered an institution locally, Fig is the proprietor at Rockin Fig Surf Headquarters on Main Street; an old-school shop with tons of surfboards that he is happy to discuss with an encyclopedic knowledge.  Rick is also a journalist of some note, having penned a column in the Huntington Beach Independent and Los Angeles Times for many years.  Hardcore surfers can find him most every day on the north side of the pier, riding waves and loving life.

The Surfers’ Hall of Fame induction ceremony pays tribute to those individuals who have made an indelible mark on the sport, industry and culture of surfing.  Annually, tens of thousands of visitors travel to Huntington Beach’s downtown area and literally walk in the footsteps of surfing superstars and legends from several eras who are immortalized in cement, including Laird Hamilton, Andy Irons, Jack O’Neill, Robert August, Bob Hurley, Sean Collins, Kelly Slater, Lisa Andersen, Pat O’Connell, Al Merrick, Shaun Tomson, Rob Machado and Rabbit Kekai.

The Surfers’ Hall of Fame induction ceremony is open to the public, free-of-charge.  Further information is available at http://hsssurf.com/shof/.

Press Contacts:
Mike Kingsbury, Jennifer Hernandez, MKM
Mike@teammkm.com; Jennifer@teammkm.com

(714) 375-2188

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2013 Surfers’ Hall of Fame Inductee – Shane Dorian

HUNTINGTON BEACH, Calif. – Shane Patrick Dorian has accomplished much as a waterman in his 40 years; from winning a Hawaiian state title and pushing the paddle-in limits on the North Shore’s outer reefs to contending for world titles, capturing prestigious big wave awards and staring in major motion pictures.  For his myriad achievements, Dorian joins fellow surfers Skip Frye and Rick “Rockin Fig” Fignetti as an inductee into the 2013 class of the Surfers’ Hall of Fame on Friday, July 26 at 10 a.m. in front of Huntington Surf & Sport.

The nation’s first imprint collection of legendary surfers, the Surfers’ Hall of Fame, celebrated its first induction in 1997 inside of specialty retailer Huntington Surf & Sport where several slabs remain.  Four years later with the blessing of the City Council and a stunning bronze statue of sport’s spiritual leader Duke Kahanamoku serving as a backdrop, the ceremony moved outside to the corner of PCH and Main; less than 100 feet from the famed Huntington Beach Pier, site of the U.S. Open of Surfing.  Visit http://hsssurf.com/shof for more information.

A fearless surfer from Hawaii’s Big Island, Shane’s lengthy resume of accomplishments includes costarring in the 1998 big-wave melodrama In God’s Hands, winning the 1999 Rip Curl Bells and 2000 Billabong Pro Mundaka World Tour events, and a top 5 ASP ranking in 2000.  The wiry (5’8”, 150 pounds) Dorian was a leading “New School” aerialist in the early ‘90s, since the middle ‘90s has been one of the world’s best big-wave riders taking top prize in the 2008 and 2013 XXL Global Big Wave awards, and is a tube rider of phenomenal agility and precision.

Shane Dorian was born on July 19, 1972 in Kailua Kona, Hawaii to his father Patrick, a former Hollywood actor and stunt double for Elvis Presley, and his mother Susan, an independent, strong-willed woman who went on to compete in female bodybuilding events.  When Shane was three, his parents opened a restaurant called Dorian’s right on the beach.  Since Dorian was too young to wait tables, the long hours hanging around the restaurant soon forced him to turn to the ocean for amusement.  Along with best friend Mike Stewart, he virtually lived at the once-empty grommet breeding pool known as Banyans…on bodyboards.

Shane began surfing at age five in 1977; it took him six years to win his first contest, then another three to win the Hawaiian State titles.  Surfing education became a top priority as Dorian’s mother worked out a system where Shane would spend the second and third school quarters on the North Shore of Oahu (the peak winter season) and the first and fourth quarters back home on the Big Island.  ”The schools didn’t really understand it,” said Shane.  ”But I don’t blame ‘em. The concept of pro surfing was so foreign to them back then.”

Dorian’s official coming-out party was during the Gotcha Pro at Sandy Beach in 1987.  He beat out big names, made it through four rounds and got some media exposure.  More importantly, he became friends with a couple of the heaviest up-and-coming surfers on Oahu, Brock Little and Todd Chesser.  With Little and Chesser leading the way and Dorian following, an informal North Shore boot camp was instated.

Shane proved in the following years he could not only keep up with the big boys but also surpass them.  But in ‘92, with a few years of heavywater experience under his belt, he followed Chesser and Little out to an outer reef during an exceptionally giant day.

“It took us, like, 45 minutes to get out there. And then when we did, we were facing these 25-foot waves with crazy cleanup sets.  I sat outside those guys for a while, but then I started getting pissed when they caught a bunch of waves,” Dorian recalls.

“About that time, the horizon went dark from this huge set and we started scratching.  I was too deep, but I wanted a wave so bad that I just flipped around and went on the first one.”  Shane launched over the falls, lost consciousness and then regained consciousness to find he could not feel his legs and was foaming at the mouth.  “I barely made it through that one, but it was a major turning point for me. As Brock said, it was the first time I realized that I was mortal.”

When he wasn’t tempting fate, Dorian engaged in much safer activities like charging Backdoor.  Surfing alongside a rapidly growing crew that included Kelly Slater, Rob Machado, Chris Malloy, Taylor Knox, Benji Weatherley and Conan Hayes, Dorian helped launch a new breed of surfing that included a whole bag of anti-gravity tricks combined with traditional carving and heavy-wave charging.  Dubbed the “New School” and well documented in Taylor Steele’s videos, the New School remained the established surfing order through the 90s.

Dorian joined the ASP World Tour in 1993 where he hovered outside of the top 10 for a number of years before cracking the barrier with a fourth-place finish in 2000.  Popular among surfers and fans, Shane finished runner-up to Kelly Slater in the 2000 Surfer Magazine Readers Poll Awards and finished 2nd in the prestigious 2001 Quiksilver in Memory of Eddie Aikau big wave contest.  Shane received the coveted “Waterman of the Year” award from SIMA in 2012, one of the sport’s highest honors.  Earlier this year, Shane Dorian went home with two awards for an unbelievable barrel ride at Jaws earlier this season, winning $55,000 for the Pacifico Tube and Billabong XXL Ride of The Year.

“Shane Dorian is one of the most famous and gifted Big Wave Surfers on the Planet and a true Surfing Legend,” said Surfers’ Hall of Fame founder Aaron Pai!  “Shane continues to inspire generations of Surfers.  We are stoked to be able to thank Shane Dorian for his achievements and contributions to our Surfing World and are happy and excited that he will be here for his induction into the Surfers’ Hall of Fame!”

The Surfers’ Hall of Fame induction ceremony pays tribute to those individuals who have made an indelible mark on the sport, industry and culture of surfing.  Annually, tens of thousands of visitors travel to Huntington Beach’s downtown area and literally walk in the footsteps of surfing superstars and legends from several eras including Laird Hamilton, Andy Irons, Jack O’Neill, Robert August, Bob Hurley, Sean Collins, Kelly Slater, Lisa Andersen, Pat O’Connell, Al Merrick, Shaun Tomson, Rob Machado and Rabbit Kekai, who are already immortalized in cement.

The Surfers’ Hall of Fame induction ceremony is open to the public, free-of-charge.  Further information is available at http://hsssurf.com/shof/.

Press Contacts:
Mike Kingsbury, Jennifer Hernandez, MKM
Mike@teammkm.com; Jennifer@teammkm.com

(714) 375-2188

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The Surfers’ Hall of Fame Announces its 2013 Inductees

SURFERS’ HALL OF FAME ANNOUNCES AN EXTRAORDINARY CLASS OF INDUCTEES AS
SHANE DORIAN, SKIP FRYE & ROCKIN’ FIG JOIN THE ELITE GROUP ON FRIDAY, JULY 26

HUNTINGTON BEACH, Calif. – The Surfers’ Hall of Fame is pleased to announce one of its most extraordinary classes to date when it inducts three generations of surfing royalty including a legendary surfer/shaper who made an indelible mark in the 60s, an iconic local personality and member of the first NSSA National Team in 1978, and a “new school” world tour veteran acknowledged as one of the best big wave riders in the world. Skip Frye, Rick “Rockin Fig” Fignetti and Shane Dorian will have their hand and footprints immortalized in cement for the ages on Friday, July 26 at 10 a.m. in front of Huntington Surf & Sport.

The Surfers’ Hall of Fame induction ceremony pays tribute to those individuals who have made an indelible mark on the sport, industry and culture of surfing. Annually, tens of thousands of visitors travel to Huntington Beach’s downtown area and literally walk in the footsteps of surfing superstars and legends from several eras including Laird Hamilton, Andy Irons, Jack O’Neill, Robert August, Bob Hurley, Sean Collins, Kelly Slater, Lisa Andersen, Pat O’Connell, Al Merrick, Shaun Tomson, Rob Machado and Rabbit Kekai, who are already immortalized in cement.

“We are extremely honored and looking forward to Skip Frye, Rick Fignetti and Shane Dorian being inducted into the Surfers’ Hall of Fame this July,” said Surfers’ Hall of Fame founder Aaron Pai. Brief inductee bios include:

Skip Frye: Skip Frye was born in 1941 and began surfing at age 16 after moving with his family to the north San Diego suburb of Pacific Beach. By the mid-60s the shy but focused Frye had become one of California’s best competitors. Known for his gliding, fluid style which allowed him to capture several local and national titles, Skip went on to represent the U.S. internationally in 1966. Frye began shaping surfboards in 1963 and within two years was working for San Diego’s Gordon & Smith’s Surfboards (in 1966 G&S introduced the Skip Frye signature model). Frye was riding a 9’6” board in late 1967 when he traveled to Australia with the legendary Windansea Surf Club for an American versus Australia team contest (the U.S. team got waxed by Aussies riding lighter boards). After that trip, Skip became more interested in shorter more maneuverable boards and began experimenting with designs such as the V-bottom and Baby Gun. He kept refining the designs and ultimately led Skip to design a board he called the Egg, one of his best-known shapes. Frye has shaped boards for Rob Machado and Brad Gerlach among other elite surfers.

“Skip Frye is one of the all-time great surfers and one of the all-time great surfboard shapers! Skip is true surfing royalty,” said Pai.

Rick “Rockin Fig” Fignetti: For more than 20 years, the name Rockin Fig has been synonymous with surfing and Huntington Beach. From his lengthy stint on KROQ FM as the resident “surfologist” to announcing major competitions like the U.S. Open of Surfing, Bud Surf Tour and NSSA Nationals, his unique and quirky voice is instantly recognizable to competitors and fans alike. Fig competed in the first NSSA National Championships in 1978, making it to the finals and was on the Orange Coast College team that won a title in 1979 and 1980. Although a 10-time

West Coast Surfing Champion, an individual NSSA title remained elusive for 35 years until he won his first (and second) titles as a 55 year-old last year. Considered an institution locally, Fig is the proprietor at Rockin Fig Surf Headquarters on Main Street; an old-school shop with tons of surfboards that he is happy to discuss with an encyclopedic knowledge. Rick is also a journalist of some note, penning a column in the Huntington Beach Independent and Los Angeles Times for many years. Hardcore surfers can find him most every day on the north side of the pier riding waves and loving life.

Pai added, “Rick ‘Rockin Fig’ Fignetti is a home grown Huntington Beach surfing legend; one of Huntington’s finest!”

Shane Dorian: A fearless surfer from Hawaii’s Big Island, Shane’s lengthy resume of accomplishments includes costarring in the 1998 big-wave melodrama In God’s Hands, winning the 1999 Rip Curl Bells and 2000 Billabong Pro Mundaka World Tour events, and a top 5 ASP ranking in 2000. The wiry (5’8”, 150 pounds) Dorian was a leading “New School” aerialist in the early ‘90s, is a tube rider of phenomenal agility and precision, and since the middle ‘90s has been one of the world’s best big-wave riders (his North Shore sessions with Brock Little and the late Todd Chesser are the stuff of legends) taking top prize in the 2008 XXL Global Big Wave awards. Shane began surfing at age five in 1977 and by the mid-late 80’s was a veteran of both the U.S. Championships and World Amateur Surfing Championships. Dorian joined the ASP World Tour in 1993 where he hovered outside of the top 10 for a number of years before cracking the barrier with a fourth-place finish in 2000. Popular among surfers and fans, Shane finished runner-up to Kelly Slater in the 2000 Surfer Magazine Readers Poll Awards and finished 2nd in the prestigious 2001 Quiksilver in Memory of Eddie Aikau big wave contest. Shane received the coveted “Waterman of the Year” award from SIMA in 2012, one of the sport’s highest honors.

Regarding Shane Dorian, Pai stated, “Shane Dorian is one of the most gifted new school big wave surfers on the planet and a truly amazing WATERMAN in our sport today!”

The nation’s first imprint collection of legendary surfers, the Surfers’ Hall of Fame celebrated its first induction in 1997 inside of specialty retailer Huntington Surf & Sport where several slabs remain. Four years later with the blessing of the City Council and a stunning bronze statue of sport’s spiritual leader Duke Kahanamoku serving as a backdrop, the ceremony moved outside to the corner of PCH and Main; less than 100 feet from the famed Huntington Beach Pier, site of the U.S. Open of Surfing.

The Surfers’ Hall of Fame induction ceremony is open to the public, free-of-charge.

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Press Contacts:
Mike Kingsbury, Jennifer Hernandez, MKM
Mike@teammkm.com; Jennifer@teammkm.com
(714) 375-2188

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Andy Verdone

Andy Verdone“When considering Andy Verdone for induction we had many of our grassroots community come out and support him because of his 25 years of coaching and supporting surfing, plus the impact that he has had on so many of the kids who live in this town,” said Surfers’ Hall of Fame founder Aaron Pai. “He has been a major “positive force” in taking our sport of surfing to the next level while telling the kids to stay in school, get good grades, stay away from drugs, go to college… he truly has been a great example to us all!”

Pai added, “Andy has impacted kid’s lives in many ways including his legendary surf trips around the world. I’ve seen him charge huge waves at Jeffreys Bay in South Africa, Byron Bay in Australia and the north side of the Huntington Pier! We are stoked to be able to recognize and to thank Andy for his contributions and achievements to our Surfing World!”

Coach Andy Verdone took over from the late Chuck Allen in ‘87-’88 and immediately lead Huntington Beach High School Surf (HBHS) Team to a NSSA National title. Verdone, who had been student teaching at Westminster High, remembers showing up to Allen’s annual banquet in 1988, just as he was retiring and Verdone about to step in. He watched as Allen gave away college scholarships to kids – nothing he’d ever seen in any other sport.

“It was big, on a grand scale,” Verdone said at the time, “Rarely do you meet a man who has had such great influence on the sport. I could call him any time, and he’d have time for me. I had a lot of sleepless nights in the early years trying to follow in his footsteps.”

Now known as the “Phil Jackson” of surf coaches, Verdone parlayed Allen’s success and has built his program into among the most successful and winningest in the country, capturing 10 NSSA National Titles as well as a National Surf League Title in 2010. A formidable ex-football coach turned 25-plus year surf coach for Huntington Beach High School, Coach Verdone is known for his disciplinary coaching style and turning out some of the best surfers in the world. He has trained and coached some of the best surfers in Huntington Beach including the Deffenbaugh brothers, Jay Larson, Micah Byrne, Shaun Ward and Brett Simpson.

A huge part of Coach Verdone’s program is his legendary surf trips with the team to such destinations as Australia, South Africa and Ireland. He also raises funds to take students to state and national tournaments. A fixture on the southside of the Huntington Beach Pier, on any given school day, you should see Andy and his merry clan, ripping the pier!

Coach Verdone and his young globetrotters appeared in a 2007 surf documentary called “Chasing the Dream”, which follows eight kids on his squad who want to become pros. Year after year 100 students try out for his squad and only 30 make the cut. Verdone’s impact on the sport of surfing in Surf City is such that one young surfer moved here from Nantucket, Massachusetts without his family just to surf for the Huntington Beach Oilers

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